DJin'

  1. Scholar

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    Ok i seem to be a lil busy. I was told that using cheaper tables to start with will help you scratch better on the good ones. how true is that and how much time should i spend learning because i never have done it...lol thats on art i would love to know.
     
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  3. Fade

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    I think that's bullshit. All you're going to accomplish by scratching on shitty tables is shitty scratches! Save your money and get some good ones. Especially with today's market, you don't necessarily need Technics 1200's, Numark and Stanton have good quality tables for a cheaper price.

    But I would still stick with 1200's, they're CLASSIC.
     
  4. Copenhagen

    Copenhagen

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    I started of with shitty Gemini tables back in the day and all I got was shitty scratches..it wont do you any good.

    However, today a lot of brands are making quality turntables and I would say that as long as the turntable isn't run by beltdrive (but uses magnetism or similar) and that you offer money on good needles, then you've got a proper turntable...

    Technics is the classic, but Numark and Stanton makes quality turntables too and Vestax makes some unbelievable turntables...but they cost the same as 50 champagne hookers in an exclusive strip joint...:D
     
  5. Scholar

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    ok check this out i have a str8-100 just one and for now i want to get rid of that because my wife(she dont know i know ) got me 2 str8-60 now are those good tables now before you guys say "man u need to keep the 100" im noe a dj nor will i ever be i just want to learn how to scratch for production sake plus a lil samplin so is the 60's good for what i want to do?
     
  6. Fade

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    I've never tried the STR8-60's but they do seem nice. If all you're looking to do is scratch a bit here and there for production, then these are fine. Just stay away from belt drives!
     
  7. vitaminman

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    Hey,

    I've only dj'd house and techno music, so my turntable skills are limited...but I do know that you need to get DIRECT DRIVE turntables if you're going to be doing any serious turntable work. Direct drives are driven by a big electro-magnet, that way there is no physical contact between the motor and platter.

    I have mixed feelings about the Technics; they're VERY expensive and only have a few features besides DD motors and pitch control. Some of the newer ones by Vestax and Numark (among others) offer steeper pitch control, reverse, digital outputs and a bunch of other neat controls that allow you to pull your records in ways that you couldn't do so easily on the 1200's.

    Seriously, you can almost buy two of the other brands for one of the Technics...

    Another thing to consider is your mixer. I've never needed anything more complex than something with eq and crossfadable cueing; my hip hop buddies are way into optical faders, frequency kill switches, hamster switches, adjustable ratios on the fader, reversable faders and switches, etc. There are some killer mixers out there for under a couple hundred bucks, the fancier ones allow you to bring effects into the mix.

    Take care,

    Nick
     
  8. MarkN

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    I have to agree with the first comment here ! buy starting out on lower price belt drive or lower end direct drive decks teaches you to perform on sub standard equipment meaning when you do get to use the higher end stuff you appreciate it more and will find it extemely easy to use ! I started out on some old shitty soundlab decks but have prgress through numerous sets of decks of varying ability through to the vestax PDX2000s i have today and i will never use another company again lol ! By learning to scratch on these weaker decks teaches to have a 'lighter' hand on the deck in order not to skip the needle now this may seem stupid and like you are just making up for the deck lacking in quality but when you do then use a high end deck you are likely to already have a 'lightet' and quciker hand to scratch with ! believe me as i have been through this process you learn a lot more on the belt drive decks as they are harder to use you do have to concentrate more and work harder to get the same effects but this teaches much quicker than a top end direct drive deck will that although will not do it for you makes it much easier to do certain things and hence doesnt give you the appreciation of the diffiulty ! Finally learning on low end decks will mean you can use all kinds of quality equipment and maybe one day when a few of you are over a mates house on the decks using lower end home stuff you will embaress a lot of so called 'dj's' who will not be used to using anything but the best ! although intially this idea seems stupid believe me in a few years you will be grateful you did it !
    Peace
     
  9. JP hardboiled

    JP hardboiled

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    that's a bunch of malarky..you need good tables right off the bat..the mechanism for cheap turntables is too weak to perform real d.j. trick especially higher forms such as beat juggling..whoever told you that probably has cheap turntables and sucks.