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Improve Your Mixes By Learning New Tips, Tricks, and Secrets

  1. Fade

    Fade

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    One of the most challenging things about music production is the mixing process. For some, it's not that complicated because they have a lot of experience and knowledge on the subject, but for the rest of us, it's hit or miss. Most of us, including myself, prefer to just make beats and produce music but mixing doesn't seem all that appealing.

    This is why it's important to know what you're doing when mixing. Unfortunately, with all the software and plug-ins available today, it makes mixing too easy.

    But it shouldn't be.

    Keeping it Simple is Key

    I have always recommended to everyone that they keep their mixes simple. The best way to do that is to load up all your tracks in your DAW with all sliders set at zero, and don't have any effects loaded. This should always be your base starting point because it guarantees that everything is straight up raw without anything interfering with your tracks.

    Once you have that done, start playing back all your tracks and try to get the best sounding mix by adjusting the volume levels of each track. If you can do that, then the rest is simple. Why? Because you're not starting with an overloaded mix (something many producers tend to do), and as such when you finally do start adding in plug-in effects, you'll see that you won't need too many anyway, which is a good thing.

    You Still Need the Know-How

    Even if you have been trained as an audio engineer, it's always good to still learn something. Just because you have a degree and some experience in a studio doesn't mean you know everything, so acquiring more knowledge on the subject of mixing is ideal.

    I recently came across a book titled, "Mixing Secrets for the Small Studio" by Mike Senior.

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    This book has some great insight into getting the right mix for the equipment you have. The author recommends that you buy certain gear, but he's also showing you the best way to achieve a great mix with what little you have because he knows a lot of people aren't recording in a professional studio.

    Most of the time it's compression that a lot of producers will throw into their mix, when in fact it's an effect that is very easy to overuse. This is why if you start your mix "raw" then you can probably get away with just using EQ and some light compression (but this all depends on your mix and what you want to achieve).

    What really caught my attention about Mike Senior's book is that he talks about treating your room. Most producers forget about room treatment and instead focus their attention on what hardware and software to buy. It doesn't mean you need to have eggshell foam all over your walls, but just a few adjustments here and there will make a difference in how you hear your mix.

    Also, if you check out the reviews of the book on Amazon, you'll notice that the author actually answers a lot of them. That shows that he cares about helping people out with their mixes.

    More Information About Audio Mixing

    So if you're having some issues with your mixes, or even if you just want to further your knowledge of mixing, follow the advice I've given above, and check out these links:
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2016
  2. REFEM

    REFEM

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    THE FECTS , SOMETIMES BRIGS FLASH TO CLEANESS . GOOD ARTICLE.
     
  3. Fade

    Fade

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  4. Calamity

    Calamity

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    Love that Mike Senior book. I have yet to read it all the way through but I always flip around it when I'm having mix problems. Dope article Fade
     
  5. eXACT

    eXACT

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    Okay, first, good heads up, Fade. I recommend this book as well. I had been thinking about buying it some while back, even though there is so much information online it's overwhelming, but it turned out, I didn't have to buy it. I came across some guy on a forum some months ago (yes, I'm cheating on you guys at Ill Muzik,) who I had helped out with some producing tips, and he noticed I had commented on the book in a previous conversation. He hit me up with a "Check your email." And guess who had a nice PDF of Mike Senior's book in my email?
    This was just something that I thought that I would share because it was done in return for me helping him out; not a pat on the back to me, but there are so fuckin many forums where all people do is talk mad shit, touting their skills and leaving everyone else in their wake to scratch their heads. That is *not* the point of forums. Next time your on, even if you have a question, try and answer someone elses as well. We're all in this shit together.
    (Some might consider the act of "sharing" the book, theft or piracy of some sort, but I like to think of it as a small bit of karma for helping people out. On the other hand, I don't believe in Karma, so, I guess, that puts me back at theft or piracy. Meh. I'll get over it.)
     
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  6. EsquireMusic111

    EsquireMusic111

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    Definitely a great read!!!! I have learned throughout the years that keeping your mix simple is the KEY!!!!!! You were right in saying that so many producers/engineers have a habit of throwing plug-in after plug-in at times in hopes that the more they add, the better the track will sound.
     
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